Saying Goodbye to Toxic Relationships

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Saying Goodbye to Toxic Relationships
Saying Goodbye to Toxic Relationships

Are there people in your life who not only bring no value to the proverbial table but seem like they’re constantly taking from you and making you feel depleted? People change and relationships, romantic and not, evolve. When a relationship becomes toxic, it’s OK to cut ties – and you should.

Reasons You Need to Let Go

Being alone is usually a whole lot better than being in bad company. Period. You get to step back, spend some time by yourself, make long-desired changes to your personal life, and move forward with a positive outlook.

Toxic relationships, sadly, tend to become abusive. This is more likely in romantic relationships, but it’s true that most toxic relationships are or will become physically, psychologically, or emotionally abusive. You owe it to yourself to move on.

You are worthy of healthy relationships. Toxic relationships tend to be very one-sided, with focus on the person you need to get away from. Healthy relationships recognize and value the unique qualities of everyone involved.

How to Get Out

We know it’s hard to cut ties. Start by keeping a journal of the things the person you’re pulling away from has done to disappoint you. Then make a list of the positive attributes of your relationship. Chances are one list will be a lot longer than the other.

Have a plan. If you feel things may get violent, ask someone to be present when you prepare to leave. At the very least, have a backup plan so you can call a family member or friend if things become difficult for you to handle. Then have the conversation. Try to do it face-to-face, but do it via phone, Skype, or some other calling app if you need to or feel safer.

You deserve to feel happy and safe. Mourn the memories and the lost relationship (it’s healthy), look towards your future, and move on.